A little bit of fall maintenance will really kick start your strawberries next spring. Strawberries are fairly hearty, even in the northeast, but they do require some help.  First of all, weed your bed thoroughly and pull out any plants that have dried up and died.  In the spring they can be replaced with healthy young plants.  There are a variety of mulches that will serve as good protectors of your strawberries, including straw, pine needles, floating row covers, leaves, etc.  And don't forget snow!  This is a great insulator, but can be somewhat unreliable as those of us in New England know. Check out this video from the University of Maine and you will be all set come spring of 2017.    

As many of you know, Billie the JR terrier has been with us for nine years.  Having moved to the new house and garden in Walpole, we decided it was time to do something for Billie and the solution was a new playmate.  Last month we brought home a 10 week old, 1 1/2 pound Jack Russell named Tillie...a great name so that when I call one, I get them both! Continue reading...

I dig my potatoes with an crooked beat up fork.  It was a good old tool with lots of character, but when we moved to the new/old house (built in 1710) the fork was lost.  I'll blame it on the junk removal guys.  When they cleaned out part of the garage, I'm sure they took one quick look at the fork and made the understandable decision...this has got to go. Continue reading...

On May 10, 2016 Agora entered the sustainable, locally grown arena in a big way.  Partnering with Ian Brown Landscaping, we have purchased and installed a super high production hydroponic growing system housed in a retrofitted shipping container.  These are the same containers you find on ships crossing the world's oceans delivering goods to hundreds of countries.  A company called Freight Farms www.freightfarms.com located on Summer St. in Boston, takes used containers and rebuilds them into these fantastic gardening systems. DSC_1089   Continue reading...

St. Patrick’s Day Peas

Wednesday, March 16th, 2016 / Leave A Comment

Ever since I started my gardening career, St. Patrick's Day has always been represented a pivitol time in the growing year. It is the day that I put my first seed in the ground...the beginning of the new season. My grandfather lived by the schedule of planting peas on St. Paddy's and harvesting on July 4th. Continue reading...

I think everyone who has the space should keep an asparagus bed.  It is the plant that keeps on giving months after you have varvested those tender young spears in the spring.  In mid summer when the eating is done, the aging spears continue to grow into beautifull willowy ferns reaching up to seven feet tall.  They really become a conversation piece to visitors who only know asparagus as eight inch high vegetables purchased at grocery store.  At some point they must come down and we are approaching that time right now. Continue reading...